Tip #162: Creating your “About Me” page

Some authors/bloggers offer great tips and topics but may find it difficult to write the “about me” page for their blogs or sites. One reason this may be is, some people feel awkward talking about themselves–or selling themselves–to others. Another reason could be that they don’t know how to write an “about me” page.

The interesting thing about the “about me” page is that it’s not just all about you! It’s also your chance to let your readers/audience know what you can do for them. What service do you provide? What types of posts will you offer? What is your level of interaction with your followers? What can you give them that they can’t find anywhere else, or at least not as easily?

A few key items can make a huge difference in how an author is perceived by his/her target audience. As well, the length of the bio is an important element–not too long or too short.

me

Here are a few things an author should include on the “about me” page:

  1. What you provide:
    A professional or, at the very least, pleasant author photo
    . No candid snapshots from your smartphone unless they are high res and decent-looking–not ones where you are drunk or in a bikini or something. You may still get followers, but probably not the type you are aiming for.
    What it does for your audience:
    This part of the post tells your readers what you look like so they can put a face with a name. It also allows them to learn a bit about your personality (by what you wear, if you smile or not, if you wear glasses, about what age you might be, if you have any identifiable marks (tattoos, abundant jewelry or makeup, etc.)).camera
  2. What you provide:
    Offer a short bio. You don’t have to list every single award or writing contest you’ve won, or every book you’ve written if you have several in one genre. Provide a few titles or even just the genre(s) you write. Tell how long you’ve been writing and how you got started, to let readers know a little bit about your journey.
    A bio can read one of two ways: in third-person POV as if an editor or publisher wrote it about you, or in first-person if you write it about yourself. Either is acceptable. The formality of it all depends on your purpose and audience for the blog/site. If you are blogging simply to offer book reviews or interact with others on a casual level, then your “about me” page doesn’t have to be so formal. But if you offer any type of professional advice and strive to present yourself as an authority in a subject or field, it’s best to provide a few clean, concise paragraphs about your background, without getting too personal.
    What it does for your audience:
    This part of the page tells your readers why you are qualified to offer the type of posts that you do. What makes you the expert in your topics?
     expert
  3. What you provide:
    Include just a few other hobbies you have besides writing
    that may encourage others to connect with you: dancing, singing, cooking, yoga, etc.
    What it does for your audience:
    This part of the post lets your followers know they are connecting with a real person–one who has other interests than blogging or writing in general. Believe it or not, those who follow blogs, read books, and write books have other interests they like to discuss on occasion.
    dancer
  4. What you provide:
    Include contact links at the bottom of the page
    so that as soon as readers have learned a little bit about you and are still in the mindset to connect with you, they can go straight to your social-media pages and follow.
    What it does for your audience:
    Contact links offer a way for your blog visitor to connect with you outside of the blog, just in case they want to learn more about you.
    social media 2
  5. What you provide:
    Include a call-to-action type of link at the bottom of the page
    –one that is hyperlinked to at least one other page on your blog. Perhaps an article or a short piece of writing. The longer a visitor stays on your blog, the better your chances of gaining a new follower.
    What it does for your audience:
    A call to action does two things: gives your visitor something to do after reading your page, and it offers the visitor a chance to look around other places on your blog.
    call to action
  6. What you provide:
    You can mention your goal for the blog/site on your “about me” page if you want to duplicate the mission portion of your front page. If you don’t have a mission statement on your blog, consider creating one and placing it on the front page. Otherwise, include it on the “about me” page.
    What it does for your audience:
    This part tells your visitor what they can expect if they stick around on your blog or decide to subscribe.
    goal setting


    A bio can read one of two ways: in third-person POV as if an editor or publisher wrote it about you, or in first-person if you write it about yourself. Either is acceptable. The formality of it all depends on your purpose and audience for the blog/site. If you are blogging simply to offer book reviews or interact with others on a casual level, then your “about me” page doesn’t have to be so formal. But if you offer any type of professional advice and strive to present yourself as an authority in a subject or field, it’s best to provide a few clean, concise paragraphs about your background, without getting too personal.

    Ultimately, the “about me” page serves as somewhat of a resume or application. The interviewer is the visitor to your blog, the one who might become a loyal follower. You must show your human side while maintaining an appropriate level of professionalism. And just like an application or resume, your “about me” page can determine if a follower sticks around or if they move on to interview someone else.
    Here is my “about me” page if you’d like to take a look:
    http://awordwithtraci.com/about/

What do YOU look for in an author’s “about me” page? What do you include on yours? Feel free to comment below!

In case you missed it yesterday

Tip #161: Tips for avoiding the word “very”!

 

 

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About Traci Sanders 254 Articles
Traci Sanders has been composing poetry, songs, and children’s stories since the young age of ten. In 2003, she opened her home to young children in her community offering “beyond the basics” teachings. In 2008, she was recognized by the Child Care Resource and Referral Agency as Family Childcare Provider of the Year and was featured in two local newspapers.

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